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Health Experts Say Vaccines Are The Best Defense Against COVID-19 Delta Variant

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Corinne Boyer
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WEKU/Ohio Valley ReSource
A vaccine clinic at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School inoculated students, staff and families with the COVID-19 vaccine.

Experts from University of Kentucky Health Care said  Wednesday that vaccinations help decrease the spread of COVID-19 variants.

As the COVID-19 virus continues to spread, it has paved the way for the virus to mutate into more transmissible strains. That’s not uncommon for viruses. But being vaccinated thwarts mutations.

Dr. Vince Venditto is an assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the UK College of Pharmacy. He has a background in vaccine design and said most hospitalizations are of people who are unvaccinated.

“And so it's evident that the vaccines are working and they're inducing the appropriate immune response to keep us protected, keep us out of the hospital and prevent death,” Venditto said.

In late June, the World Health Organization recommended that vaccinated people still wear masks to prevent the spread of the delta variant.

Becky Dutch, a virologist at the University of Kentucky, said she is not currently wearing a mask. But she might reconsider masking up if she spent time in a crowded room.

“And if this keeps getting worse, I might consider just simply to decrease any chances that I might pick it up or spread it if I had picked up something,” Dutch said. “But at this moment, the data doesn't seem to support the idea that vaccinated people need to be cautious because vaccinated people are quite safe.”

If you live with children under 12 or someone who is immune compromised who aren’t vaccinated, experts still say the best way to protect them is by wearing a mask.

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