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Educators are looking to help with pandemic related learning loss in Kentucky

stock photo of a classroom
pixabay.com
stock photo of a classroom

Kentucky students are still recovering from learning loss related to the COVID-19 pandemic. One way educators are working to deal with this issue is through the use of “community schools.”  

Donny Hale is the regional deputy director at the Institute for Educational Leadership. He said these community schools take a different approach than traditional learning institutions.

“Community school is about being intentional and deliberate. It really is about emphasizing really, relationships, a community vision, shared ownership and communication. What makes it different in the core element is, it is a coordinator to coordinate, communicate and collaborate. It allows you to really bring people in and have consistent relationships.”

Hale said one of the main goals of a community school is to remove the non-educational barriers that prevent students from moving forward in school.

Hale said it is important to know who educators are working with in order for them to be successful.

“When you begin to understand the people and begin to disagrigate the data, you begin to help people understand, “here are some solutions with some ideas that have helped you in the past, it doesn't determine your outcome, but it helps you to determine what solutions you want to take as you move forward.””

Hale said community schools can work in urban areas as well rural areas like eastern Kentucky. He said it’s important for people to have their own voice in their future.

Hear more with Donny Hale of the Institute for Educational Leadership on Eastern Standard, on WEKU.

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Stan Ingold is WEKU's News Director. He has worked in public broadcasting for 18 years, starting at Morehead State Public Radio before spending the past 10 years at Alabama Public Radio. Stan has been honored with numerous journalism awards for his public radio reporting.
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