© 2022 WEKU
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
TMartin.jpg

Tom Martin

Producer/Host

Tom Martin is the host of Eastern Standard, a weekly radio magazine of interviews and stories about interesting people, places, and things happening in the Commonwealth.

Martin, a Morehead native, has served as news anchor for KQV Radio in Pittsburgh, a Peabody Award-winning anchor and documentarian at AP Radio Network News in Washington, D.C., as well as a news anchor for the RKO Radio Network, ABC Network News and WABC News in New York. Tom also served for five years as vacation substitute for commentator Paul Harvey. 

He hosted "The World's First Rhythm and News Show" on WVLK-Lexington and was founding program director and morning host on WRVG, the former public station at Georgetown College. 

From 2005 until 2013, Tom was the founding editor in chief for Business Lexington.

 

  • On this week’s edition of Eastern Standard:How Senate Bill 1, passed in the most recent session of the Kentucky General Assembly, encourages teachers in Kentucky public schools to avoid classroom discussion of controversial topics and untruths. Education contributor Cynthia Resor talks with Russell County public school social studies teacher Donnie Wilkerson. LexPhil director Allison Kaiser fills us in on the 2022-23 season with some new twists in both programming and concert venues. ArtsConnect founder Kate Savage begins a new arts series on Eastern Standard in conversation with Lexington muralist Wylie Caudill. Magnolia Boulevard’s Maggie Noelle on emerging from the hard times of the pandemic and the loss of a beloved band member to take their Southern Rock groove back to the stage. LEXToday.com editor Molly Thompson visits with Nini Edwards of Edwards-Harkness vineyards to discover fun and interesting day trip destinations in and near Winchester.
  • On this week’s edition of Eastern Standard:How Senate Bill 1, passed in the most recent session of the Kentucky General Assembly, encourages teachers in Kentucky public schools to avoid classroom discussion of controversial topics and untruths. Education contributor Cynthia Resor talks with Russell County public school social studies teacher Donnie Wilkerson.LexPhil director Allison Kaiser fills us in on the 2022-23 season with some new twists in both programming and concert venues.ArtsConnect founder Kate Savage begins a new arts series on Eastern Standard in conversation with Lexington muralist Wylie Caudill.Magnolia Boulevard’s Maggie Noelle on emerging from the hard times of the pandemic and the loss of a beloved band member to take their Southern Rock groove back to the stage.LEXToday.com editor Molly Thompson visits with Nini Edwards of Edwards-Harkness vineyards to discover fun and interesting day trip destinations in and near Winchester.
  • From weeks trapped in a basement shelter in the devastated eastern Ukraine city of Mariupol to safety in Lexington: Valery Kaidanov on the odyssey of her 84-year old mother, Vera Lisen. | After inflation is taken into account, state employee wages have declined over a decade. An analysis of a workforce crisis in Frankfort | The deeply partisan Senate confirmation hearing for judge Ketanji Brown Jackson as viewed through the lens of Dr. Melynda Price, Professor of Law and Humanities and Director of the UK Gaines Center for the Humanities. | Why Katie Toupin parted ways with Louisville’s Houndmouth and now calls Lexington home and how it all connects with Blink 182.
  • From weeks trapped in a basement shelter in the devastated eastern Ukraine city of Mariupol to safety in Lexington: Valery Kaidanov on the odyssey of her 84-year old mother, Vera Lisen. | After inflation is taken into account, state employee wages have declined over a decade. An analysis of a workforce crisis in Frankfort | The deeply partisan Senate confirmation hearing for judge Ketanji Brown Jackson as viewed through the lens of Dr. Melynda Price, Professor of Law and Humanities and Director of the UK Gaines Center for the Humanities. | Why Katie Toupin parted ways with Louisville’s Houndmouth and now calls Lexington home and how it all connects with Blink 182.
  • On the next edition of Eastern Standard: Country music star Naomi Judd, whose recent death has been attributed to mental health issues, discusses her condition and life in a 2014 KET interview with journalist Bill Goodman. Eating disorders have increased in frequency during the pandemic. Contributor Cynthia Resor discusses these conditions with a specialist in the field, Dr. Sydney Brodeur-Johnson. And in his 50th year covering the Kentucky General Assembly, Al Cross joins us to talk about legislative business being carried out in Frankfort behind doors closed to the public and reporters.
  • On the next edition of Eastern Standard: Country music star Naomi Judd, whose recent death has been attributed tomental health issues, discusses her condition and life in a 2014 KET interview with journalist Bill Goodman. Eating disorders have increased in frequency during the pandemic. ES Contributor Cynthia Resor discussesthese conditions with a specialist in the field, Dr. Sydney Brodeur-Johnson. And in his 50th year covering the Kentucky General Assembly, Al Cross joins us to talk about legislative business being carried out in Frankfort behind doors closed to the public and reporters.
  • You may have sung the first verse of Stephen Foster’s “My Old Kentucky Home,” but are you aware of the story of slavery told in the remaining verses? Historian Emily Bingham has published a book about it. Tom Eblen gets details and we listen to a version performed by the baritone Paul Robeson. Our first ten-minute radio play highlights Jimmy Winkfield, the last of the great black jockeys. And we hear about the efforts of the Legacy Equine Academy to increase diversity and inclusion in the horse industry. As war rages in Ukraine with the alarming reality that no credible diplomatic track exists to end the war, two students from UK’s Patterson School of Diplomacy offer their thoughts and views. And we’ll have details of the annual Paris Story Fest.
  • You may have sung the first verse of Stephen Foster’s “My Old Kentucky Home,” but are you aware of the story of slavery told in the remaining verses? Historian Emily Bingham has published a book about it. Tom Eblen gets details and we listen to a version performed by the baritone Paul Robeson. Our first ten-minute radio play highlights Jimmy Winkfield, the last of the great black jockeys. And we hear about the efforts of the Legacy Equine Academy to increase diversity and inclusion in the horse industry. As war rages in Ukraine with the alarming reality that no credible diplomatic track exists to end the war, two students from UK’s Patterson School of Diplomacy offer their thoughts and views. And we’ll have details of the annual Paris Story Fest.
  • On the next Eastern Standard: The proposal to switch to permanent Daylight Savings Time, passed by the Senate, is hung up in the House. UK biologist Bruce O’Hara, who studies circadian rhythms, discusses how DST impacts physical health | McClatchy Washington political correspondent David Catanese on partisan redistricting in Kentucky and elsewhere | A conversation with the curator of a digital archive of 1930s recordings of Eastern Kentucky folk artists | How “devised theater” differs from improv | Details of the forthcoming Rural Assembly Everywhere
  • On the next Eastern Standard: The proposal to switch to permanent Daylight Savings Time, passed by the Senate, is hung up in the House. UK biologist Bruce O’Hara, who studies circadian rhythms, discusses how DST impacts physical health | McClatchy Washington political correspondent David Catanese on partisan redistricting in Kentucky and elsewhere | A conversation with the curator of a digital archive of 1930s recordings of Eastern Kentucky folk artists | How “devised theater” differs from improv | Details of the forthcoming Rural Assembly Everywhere
If you appreciate access to this important content during this global pandemic, please help us continue to provide public service journalism and information to Central and Eastern Kentucky communities.