© 2024 WEKU
Lexington's Radio News Leader
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
Update: We now have $67,900 to go to meet our annual fundraising goal by June 30. You can help WEKU cross the finish line with your support! Click here to make your donation. Thank you!!

Amsterdam was flooded with tourists in 2023, so it won't allow any more hotels

Tens of thousands of people watched as dozens of colorfully decorated boats toured the Dutch capital's historic canals Saturday, Aug. 5, 2023, in the most popular event of a six-day Pride Amsterdam festival that attracts tens of thousands of visitors to the city.
Peter Dejong
/
AP
Tens of thousands of people watched as dozens of colorfully decorated boats toured the Dutch capital's historic canals Saturday, Aug. 5, 2023, in the most popular event of a six-day Pride Amsterdam festival that attracts tens of thousands of visitors to the city.

Amsterdam's local government is cracking down on local over-tourism by putting a ban on new hotels, it said Wednesday.

New hotels can only be built if another closes down, and the city is urging developers to choose a site outside of the city center.

If a new hotel is built in place of an old one, it must be more modern or more sustainable. Twenty-six hotels that have already been issued permits will not be affected by the ban, the city said.

The move was triggered by Amsterdam's "Tourism in balance" policy, which was created in 2021 after a public initiative in which 30,000 residents called for more control of the tourism industry.

Under "tourism in balance," aims to limit overnight stays in hotels by tourists to 20 million a year. In 2023 tourists spent about 20.7 million nights in Amsterdam, a number that doesn't include vacation rentals, bed and breakfast stays or cruise trips. That means "the municipal executive is obliged to take action," the city says.

Amsterdam also has been attempting to curb other behaviors by tourists, including banning cannabis smoking in certain parts of the city, closing some clubs and bars earlier, placing new limits on canal cruises and converting some hotels into homes or offices.

Copyright 2024 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Ayana Archie
[Copyright 2024 NPR]
WEKU depends on support from those who view and listen to our content. There's no paywall here. Please support WEKU with your donation.
Related Content