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Manchester receives $952 thousand for Volunteers of America substance abuse treatment program

Manchester clay county.jpeg
Manchester Tourism
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Nearly a million dollars in funding from the Appalachian Regional Commission is headed to Clay County. Senator Mitch McConnell made the announcement Tuesday. More than $952,000 dollars will allow Volunteers of America to expand their substance abuse treatment program in Manchester.

James Ed Garrison is the mayor of Manchester. He said the Volunteers of America Recovery Community Center has helped many people struggling with substance abuse in his community.

“I think we’re getting turned around here, on that. A lot of peoples come out of there and got jobs and stuff through their treatment center down here. And we’re glad to see them and be glad to see what’s going on Bridge Street,” said Garrison.

This is part of a larger project to revitalize downtown Manchester. The mayor said the project is bringing restaurants and shops into the city’s economy and when its complete, they hope to bring in more tourism.

“The top of one building will be like four Airbnbs to rent and some shops, you know, down below it. Just a nice place to sit out and look at the river down there,” said Garrison.

The funding from the Appalachian Regional Commission will help Volunteers of America renovate a space in the area. Mayor Garrison said he expects the project to be complete in late 2024.

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Samantha is WEKU's All Things Considered Host and also reports on news of interest in the commonwealth. Sam is a graduate of Morehead State University and worked for MSU's Public Radio Station WMKY.
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