© 2024 WEKU
Lexington's Radio News Leader
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
Update: We now have $71,000 to go to meet our annual fundraising goal by June 30. You can help WEKU cross the finish line with your support! Click here to make your donation. Thank you!!

Kentucky will receive more than $74 million in federal funds to continue cleaning up hazards left by historic mining

Kentucky Lt. Governor Jacqueline Coleman announcing the funds to clean up historic coal mining sites
Kentucky Governor's Office
/
Youtube.com
Kentucky Lt. Governor Jacqueline Coleman announcing the funds to clean up historic coal mining sites

Kentucky will receive more than $74 million dollars in federal funds to continue cleaning up hazards left by historic mining throughout the state.

 The money comes from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, issued through the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.

During a recent press conference, Lieutenant Governor Jacqueline Coleman said there are several projects that will benefit from this funding.

“This money will be used to make people's lives better by fixing mine slides, putting out seam fires and closing dangerous open portals. The funding will also be used to rebuild ailing water infrastructure and address water supply issues.”

Lieutenant Governor Coleman said this is another step forward in helping some of those who need it most.

“This program has already done so much to protect Kentucky homes and make communities safer. This new round of funding will allow us to get to areas that sorely need it. With previous grants we have begun or completed more than 40 projects in 15 counties totally almost $45 million dollars.”

Projects that are eligible to receive BIL funding in Kentucky are those affected by coal mining that ceased prior to May 18, 1982.

The state prioritizes projects based on the severity of the hazard. The state has already used some of these funds to start or completed more than 40 projects in 15 counties totaling almost $45 million dollars.

These projects were located in Bell, Boyd, Breathitt, Floyd, Harlan, Hopkins, Johnson, Knott, Leslie, Letcher, Ohio, Perry, Pike, Webster and Whitley counties.

** WEKU is working hard to be a leading source for public service, and fact-based journalism. Monthly supporters are the top funding source for this growing nonprofit news organization. Please join others in your community who support WEKU by making your donation.

Stan Ingold is WEKU's News Director. He has worked in public broadcasting for 18 years, starting at Morehead State Public Radio before spending the past 10 years at Alabama Public Radio. Stan has been honored with numerous journalism awards for his public radio reporting.
WEKU depends on support from those who view and listen to our content. There's no paywall here. Please support WEKU with your donation.
Related Content