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Creators of 'I Like Your Hair' hope to change how people with alopecia are treated

<strong>Left:</strong> "You can feel the stares. Yes, I'm here, I'm bald, and I exist. What about it?" Faith Williams <strong>Right:</strong> "This journey takes you through radical acceptance. You're going outside, showing your true self. I am not hiding." Jennifer Gadosky
Paris Benson
Left: "You can feel the stares. Yes, I'm here, I'm bald, and I exist. What about it?" Faith Williams Right: "This journey takes you through radical acceptance. You're going outside, showing your true self. I am not hiding." Jennifer Gadosky

September is Alopecia Awareness Month, intended to be a time to educate people about the condition — an autoimmune condition that damages hair follicles and causes hair loss — and to support those who live with it.

"I Like Your Hair" is an honest expression of what it feels like to exist as a bald woman in public spaces. Inspired by creative director Natalie Marinides' real life experiences with alopecia, this project was created in the hopes that the next time someone runs into a stranger with a physical difference, they know what they should — or mostly shouldn't say.

The project started as a seed of an idea at Natalie, Trisha and Paris' kitchen table in Brooklyn, N.Y. During a casual morning conversation, they discussed multiple comments that had been made toward Natalie — a bald woman — that weekend while they were out. One of which, "I like your hair," had been said to her by a stranger with seemingly good intentions, only served to make her feel uncomfortably self-aware. All three creatives were itching to collaborate and create something new, and they decided to endeavor on a project that would hopefully make way for a change in how people with alopecia are treated in public.

The short-documentary and photo series combines personal anecdotes from four women who live in and around the New York City area. Jennifer Gadosky, Alison Mann, Faith Williams and Jenny Jobson are all individuals with alopecia. Most have experienced the condition for the majority of their lives, and all have occurrences to share regarding unsolicited comments in public spaces. Both the film and photo series seek to recognize their stories and bring a contemporary, intimate and authentic perspective to the matter.

Creative Director/Producer: Natalie Marinides, see more of Natalie's work on www.nataliemarinides.com or instagram @bold.and.bare

Photographer/Stylist: Paris Benson, see more of Paris' work on www.parisebenson.com or instagram @paris.benson.

Director/DP/Editor: Trisha Pickelhaupt, see more of Trisha's work on trishapickelhaupt.com or instagram @trishapickelhaupt.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Trisha Pickelhaupt
Natalie Marinides
Paris Benson
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